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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 56  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 71-75

Profile of brain tumors having ocular manifestations in a Tertiary Eye Care Institute: A retrospective study


1 Department of Ophthalmology, Sri Sankaradeva Nethralaya, Guwahati, Assam, India
2 Department of Ocular Pathology, Uveitis and Neuro-Ophthalmology, Sri Sankaradeva Nethralaya, Guwahati, Assam, India
3 Department of Vitreo-Retina Surgery, Sri Sankaradeva Nethralaya, Guwahati, Assam, India
4 Department of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Sri Sankaradeva Nethralaya, Guwahati, Assam, India
5 Department of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Sri Sankaradeva Nethralaya, Guwahati, Assam, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh Deshmukh
Department of Ophthalmology, Sri Sankaradeva Nethralaya, 96, Basistha Road, Beltola, Guwahati - 781 028, Assam
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/tjosr.tjosr_49_18

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Aim: To form a profile of brain tumors having ocular manifestations presenting to a tertiary eye care institute. Materials and Methods: The medical records of patients diagnosed with primary brain tumors between January 2012 and December 2017 were reviewed. Patients underwent a detailed ocular examination and neuroimaging to confirm the diagnosis. Results: Out of the 17 patients, 11 (65%) were female and 6 (35%) were male. The mean age was found to be 43.17 ± 11.04 years and the majority of the patients belonged to the age group 21—40 years (47.06%). The most common presenting symptom was found to be diminution of vision (100%), followed by headache (41.14%) and vertigo (23.52%). The most common sign was optic disc changes, namely optic atrophy (47.05%), followed by disc pallor (29.41%) and papilledema (11.76%). Meningioma (41%) was the most common tumor followed by pituitary macroadenomas (29%). At the time of presentation, two patients had the restriction of extraocular movements, seven patients had a positive relative afferent pupillary defect, and four had defective color vision. Conclusions: Ophthalmic signs and symptoms form a major part of the presentation in patients with intracranial tumors. Majority of the patients diagnosed by ophthalmologists with brain tumors presented with optic disc pallor or edema resulting in diminution of vision. By careful neuro-ophthalmic evaluation, early diagnosis of intracranial space occupying lesions can be made and prompt referral to neurosurgeon can reduce the morbidity and mortality.


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