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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 57  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 289-293

Knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding eye donation in patients attending outpatient department of tertiary care hospital of Western India


Department of Ophthalmology, C. U. Shah Medical College and Hospital, Surendranagar, Gujarat, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Aruna K R Gupta
Department of Ophthalmology, C. U. Shah Medical College and Hospital, Dhudrej Road, Surendranagar - 363 001, Gujarat
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/tjosr.tjosr_80_19

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Aims and Objectives: The aim of the study is to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding eye donation in patients attending outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: The data were collected by the questionnaire method from 500 patients waiting in outpatient department of ophthalmology. The questionnaire included questions pertaining to demographic profile, literacy, occupation, awareness about eye donation, willingness to donate, reasons for not pledging, and the sources of information. Results: Percentage of awareness of eye donation was equal in males and females. Significantly less awareness of eye donation was found in illiterate individuals (P < 0.0001) and Muslims (P < 0.0001). 66.6% participants were aware of eye donation and eye camps were the major source of information. 51.50% were willing to pledge their eyes. Lack of awareness was the major reason for not willing to pledge in 32.91% participants. Chi-square analysis between “awareness” and “willingness” groups showed that age group, gender, residency, and occupations were independent factors contributing to willingness to donate, while religion and education showed significant association between awareness and willingness (P < 0.05). Participants who were initially not aware about eye donation (33.6%), after being counseled showed positive responses of willingness to pledge. Conclusion: The data showed that most of the people were aware about eye donation and were willing to donate their eyes; however, the attitude and practice showed mixed responses. Participants had misconceptions about eye donation. Therefore, to reduce the burden of avoidable corneal blindness effective measures should be taken by ophthalmologists, physicians, and especially religious leaders to educate and motivate people for eye donation.


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