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 Table of Contents  
OPHTHALMIC IMAGES
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 59  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 105-106

A vanishing brown lens: Interesting case findings!


Department of Ophthalmology, Adesh Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Bathinda, Punjab, India

Date of Submission11-Jul-2020
Date of Decision06-Sep-2020
Date of Acceptance20-Jul-2020
Date of Web Publication27-Mar-2021

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Priyanka S Gupta
Department of Ophthalmology, Adesh Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Barnala Road, Bhucho, Bathinda - 151 001, Punjab
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/tjosr.tjosr_87_20

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  Abstract 


Lens absorption has been reported to be associated with uveitis, downs syndrome, morgagnian cataract and trauma. However, spontaneous absorption of hard brown lens is a rare entity. The exact mechanism by which a lens undergoes spontaneous absorption despite an intact capsular bag is still unknown. Here we present a case of elderly female who presented to us with right eye hard brown cataract with ongoing process of getting absorbed and intact capsular bag.

Keywords: Brown cataract, ectropion uveae, lens absorption


How to cite this article:
Gupta PS. A vanishing brown lens: Interesting case findings!. TNOA J Ophthalmic Sci Res 2021;59:105-6

How to cite this URL:
Gupta PS. A vanishing brown lens: Interesting case findings!. TNOA J Ophthalmic Sci Res [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Dec 1];59:105-6. Available from: https://www.tnoajosr.com/text.asp?2021/59/1/105/312284




  Introduction Top


Lens absorption has been reported to be associated with uveitis, downs syndrome, morgagnian cataract and trauma. However, spontaneous absorption of hard brown lens is a rare entity. The exact mechanism by which a lens undergoes spontaneous absorption despite an intact capsular bag is still unknown. Here we present a case of elderly female who presented to us with right eye hard brown cataract with ongoing process of getting absorbed and intact capsular bag.


  Case Report Top


A 75-year-old female patient presented with a history of diminution of vision in the right eye for the past 30 years. On examination, the vision in the right eye was counting finger near the face. Slit-lamp examination revealed dilated pupil in the right eye with a partially absorbed dense brown cataract [Figure 1]. There was a triangular gap in the intact capsule bag due to tug created by the remnant lens at 6 o'clock position and ectropion uveae at 12 o'clock position. There was no evidence of keratic precipitates or anterior chamber reaction. The anterior hyaloid face was intact. Intraocular pressure was 16 mmHg. Fundus examination revealed pale disc in the right eye. The patient did not report of any history of trauma, pain, or redness in the right eye. In our case, the patient was unwilling to undergo any further management of the right eye, so the cause of absorption could not be assessed.
Figure 1: Partially absorbed brown lens with capsule getting pulled at 6 o'clock

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  Discussion Top


Spontaneous cataract absorption was first described by Saunders in 1811.[1] It has been reported to be associated with Morgagnian cataract, trauma,[2] uveitis,[3] downs syndrome,[4] and phacolytic glaucoma.[5] However, a hard brown nucleus undergoing absorption is a rare entity, especially in the modern day scenario.

The structural and chemical changes in capsule have been reported to facilitate lens absorption in inflammatory conditions.[6] However, the exact mechanism that leads to absorption of lens in intact capsule is still not fully elucidated. Further research on the subject may help us to delve deeper into the factors that potentiate lens absorption.

Declaration of patient consent

The author certifies that all appropriate patient consent forms have been obtained. In the form, the patient has given her consent for her images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patient understands that her name and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal her identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Ehlrich LH. Spontaneous absorption of congenital cataract following maternal rubella. Arch Ophthalmol 1948;7:332-5.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Marlow SB. Spontaneous absorption of cataract. Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc 1952;50:283-93.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Rathinam SR, Namperumalsamy P, Emett T, Cunningham Jr. Spontaneous cataract absorption in patients with leptospiral uveitis. Br J Ophthalmol 2000;84:1135-41.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Mohan M, Bartholomew RS. Spontaneous absorption of a cataractous lens. Acta Ophthalmol Scand 1999;77:476-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Blaise P, Duchesne B, Guillaume S, Galand A. Spontaneous recovery in phacolytic glaucoma. J Cataract Refract Surg 2005;31:1829-30.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Gönül Ş, Bozkurt Oflaz A, Bakbak B, Yavuzer K, Bozkurt B. Spontaneous lens absorption initially misdiagnosed as crystalline lens luxation. Turk J Ophthalmol 2018;48:320-2.  Back to cited text no. 6
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1]



 

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